JMS 375 Journalism and Media History

last modified 2019-09-10T09:06:27-04:00
This page hosts links to resources that will help you research the history of Journalism.

Primary Source Databases

  • New York Times (ProQuest) — Coverage: 1851-2013. Includes all the articles published since the first issue of the paper in 1851. Provides full text and full image articles with digital reproductions of every page, every article and every issue in PDF format. In addition to news stories, includes editorials, letters to the editor, obituaries, birth and marriage announcements, photos, and advertisements. You can browse issues by selecting "Publications" above the search box.
  • Georgia Historic Newspapers — The Georgia Historic Newspapers Archive is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), a part of Georgia’s Virtual Library GALILEO and is based at the University of Georgia Libraries. Since 2007, the DLG has partnered with universities, archives, public libraries, historical societies, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions to digitize historical newspapers from around the state. The archive is free and open for public use and includes over one million Georgia newspaper pages between 1786 and 1986.
  • American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 1 (1691-1820) — The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 1 (1691-1820) presents more than 500 titles dating from 1691 through 1820. The collection represents almost two centuries of print culture, ranging from early works imported by colonists to later titles published on American soil on the eve of the Revolution and during the early republic. Consisting of more than 850,000 pages, the database’s holdings are broad and deep in scope. Almost every seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American title is represented. Subject strengths include but are not limited to Afro-Americana, agriculture, children's literature, education, eighteenth-century imprints, leisure and hobbies, Masonic works, medicine, religion, science and technology, the trades, and women's literature.
  • American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 2 (1821 - 1837) — The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 2 (1821-1837) presents more than 1,100 titles dating from 1821 through 1837 and documents the growth and expansion of the new nation during the Jacksonian era, from the aftermath of the Panic of 1819 through the Panic of 1837. The variety of topics these periodicals cover – agriculture, entertainment, literary criticism, domestic arts, technology, medicine (both traditional and alternative), and politics.
  • American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 3 (1838 - 1852) — The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 3 (1838-1852) presents more than 1,700 titles that reveal a rapidly growing young nation where industrialization, the railroads, regional political differences, and life on the western frontier were daily realities. Subjects covered in the collection reach into every facet of American life, including science, literature, medicine, agriculture, women’s fashion, family life, and religion.
  • American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 4 (1853 - 1865) — The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 4 (1852-1865) presents more than 1,400 titles dating from 1853 through 1865. While the Civil War is a focal point, the collection also offers a diverse record of the continuance of daily life for many Americans—both leading up to and during the war. More detailed subject matter includes psychiatry, gardening, freed African Americans, temperance, the Irish question, Freemasonry, the U.S. Postal Service, and dentistry.
  • American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 5 (1866 - 1912) — The American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 5 presents more than 2,000 titles dating from 1866 through 1912. The themes presented in this database reflect a nation that persevered through a most difficult set of circumstances: a bloody civil war that claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, the incorporation of the recently freed African Americans into American life, and a population that rapidly expanded into the Western territories. Broad subject areas covered in the collection reach into every facet of American life, including science, literature, medicine, agriculture, women’s fashion, family life, and religion.

Primary Source Open Access Resources

  • Chronicling America — a website providing access to information about historic newspapers and select digitized newspaper pages, and is produced by the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). NDNP, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress (LC), is a long-term effort to develop an Internet-based, searchable database of U.S. newspapers with descriptive information and select digitization of historic pages. Supported by NEH, this rich digital resource will be developed and permanently maintained at the Library of Congress. An NEH award program will fund the contribution of content from, eventually, all U.S. states and territories.
  • The Punch Repository — The University of Pennsylvania hosts this guide for finding access to complete issues of Punch form 1841-1922. You can find some images that are still under copyright on Punch's Archive.

Secondary Source Databases

  • Communication & Mass Media Complete (EBSCO) — Provides access to quality research journals and publications in areas related to communication and mass media. (This resource is made available to the Mercer community by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.)
  • JSTOR — An online archive containing back issues of scholarly journals in many disciplines.
  • Project MUSE (Standard Collection) — This is an interdisciplinary collection of high quality, peer reviewed journals extensively in the humanities and social sciences.