Annotated Bibliography & Research Brief (Mooring, Fall 2012)

by TWOMBLY_EL — last modified 2016-04-28T16:30:23-04:00

Contents:
Getting Started
Picking a Topic
Searching for Sources
Citing Sources
Writing an Annotated Bibliography


Getting Started


This section provides some 'tips & tricks' prior to starting your research using Jack Tarver Library resources.

  • 'Log In' to Jack Tarver Library - This will enable you to access full-text articles that you find in the databases without having to type in a password. The 'Log In' button is in the top right-hand corner of the Tarver Library homepage.
  • Peer-Reviewed (Scholarly) Journal v. Popular Magazine - Your assignments require that you find peer-reviewed sources. Prior to beginning your research, watch this brief video to familiarize yourself with the differences between popular and scholarly sources.
  • C.R.A.P. Test - Depending on your field of study and current topic, you may use a variety of resources in your research. You will need to evaluate all of them to determine whether or not they are reliable and relevant to your current project. Whether you have a book, article, website, or other source, you can use the C.R.A.P. Test to decide whether or not it's worth including in your resource list.
  • Anatomy of a Journal Citation - A citation is the information that is used to help people to locate an article. When you write an article, you cite your sources in a bibliography or works cited list at the end, so that others can find those sources in the future. Various style guides call for slightly different citation layouts, but the same basic elements are usually there.

 

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Picking a Topic


Before beginning your research, consider possible topics by consulting your textbook, Beyond Engineering: How Society Shapes Technology by Robert Pool. Also, brainstorm various ways to express your topic. While not considered an authoritative source, Wikipedia can provide an overview of a particular topic as well as ideas for keywords to use while searching for articles and books.

Below is a list of keywords that could be used to find information about steam engines. Keywords can be used independently (steam engines) or grouped together (steam engines and history) and can be used either to narrow or to broaden your searches.

  • steam engines
  • steam-powered engine
  • atmospheric engine
  • steam turbines
  • turbines
  • history
  • inventions
  • innovations

 

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Searching for Sources

 

Using the keywords that you brainstormed for your topic, begin your research by selecting one of the following resources to find information about that topic.


Resources for finding articles:

  • Science & Technology Collection (EBSCO) — Topics include aeronautics, astrophysics, biology, chemistry, computer technology, geology, aviation, physics, archaeology, marine sciences and materials science. In addition to the full text, this database offers indexing and abstracts for more than 1,700 publications. — Topics include aeronautics, astrophysics, biology, chemistry, computer technology, geology, aviation, physics, archaeology, marine sciences and materials science. In addition to the full text, this database offers indexing and abstracts for more than 1,700 publications.
  • Web of Science (Web of Knowledge/Thomson Reuters) - Provides detailed citations and abstracts for the top scholarly periodicals in the sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities. Includes the Science Citation Index, the Social Sciences Citation Index, and the Arts & Humanities Citation Index. Covers both domestic and international journals, open access resources, books, patents, proceedings, and Web sites.


Tips for searching databases:

  • Although databases may look different, most have similar features for assisting with your research.
  • Most databases have full-text access to articles indicated by images similar to:
  • If full-text is not available for an article, there may be an option to or
    • The first step to locating the actual article is to search either e-Journals or the Library Catalog (see 'Resources for locating the actual articles' below).
    • If the full-text still cannot be found after searching e-Journals or the Library Catalog, place a request through Interlibrary Loan (see 'Resources for locating the actual articles' below).
  • Databases provide several options for refining your searches:
  • Other database features may include:
    • saving, printing, emailing, and exporting articles
    • citing articles using APA, MLA, Chicago, etc., styles

 

Resources for locating the actual articles:

  • e-Journals - This resource will search for journal titles that have full-text articles available and can be found in databases subscribed to by the library. Articles not in full-text in one database may be found in full-text in another database. Make sure you have all of the information about the article: author, article title, journal title, volume number, issue number, publication date, and page numbers (see Anatomy of a Journal Citation).
  • Library Catalog - Use the Library Catalog to search for journal titles in print format. You can perform a 'Title' search by typing in the name of the journal that has the article you need. Make sure you have all of the information about the article: author, article title, journal title, volume number, issue number, publication date, and page numbers. An overview for locating library materials in the catalog is available.
  • Interlibrary Loan - When an article cannot be found using library resources, Jack Tarver Library's Interlibrary Loan department will search outside of Mercer University to locate that item for you. A request needs to be made in order to initiate that search. You can either use the pre-populated forms embedded in the databases () or use the Interlibrary Loan journal article request form. Again, make sure you have all of the information about the article: author, article title, journal title, volume number, issue number, publication date, and page numbers.

 

Resources for finding books:

  • Library Catalog - Use the Library Catalog to search for books in print and electronic formats. You can search for books by keyword, title, author, or subject. An overview for locating library materials in the catalog is available.
  • WorldCat [books and publications owned by libraries worldwide] (FirstSearch) - The world's most comprehensive bibliography with bibliographic records representing information spanning 4,000 years of knowledge. It is the OCLC Online Union Catalog of information contributed by OCLC (Online Computer Library Center) member libraries worldwide.
  • Interlibrary Loan - When a book cannot be found using library resources, Jack Tarver Library's Interlibrary Loan department will search outside of Mercer University to locate that item for you. A request needs to be made in order to initiate that search. You will need to use the Interlibrary Loan book/microfilm/dissertation request form. Make sure you have all of the information about the book: book title, author or editor, publisher, publication date, and ISBN number.

 

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Citing Sources

 

Zotero — Zotero (pronounced "zoh-TAIR-oh") is software that collects, manages, and cites research sources. It's easy to use, lives in your web browser where you do your work, and best of all it's free. Zotero allows you to attach PDFs, notes and images to your citations, organize them into collections for different projects, and create bibliographies. Read more . . . or view the video tutorials.

 

Manuals for the APA style also are available in electronic and print formats.

 

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Writing an Annotated Bibliography


Below are links to guides for writing annotated bibliographies. The information provided also includes examples using the APA style.

 

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